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Cargo Vans: Prosperity as a Problem

Demand for cargo vans has builders scrambling to increase production.

Sales of the full-size, Euro-style Sprinter, handled by Freightliner and Mercedes-Benz dealers, have grown enough that it will be assembled here instead of being imported as knocked-down kits from Germany and reassembled at a plant near Charleston, S.C., says Volker Mornhinweg, head of M-B Vans. It will invest about $500 million to build a new van plant in the same area to supply the North American market with the next-generation Sprinter.

General Motors plans to speed up assembly lines at its Wixom, Mo., factory, where its Chevrolet Express and GMC Savana traditional full-size vans are produced. Ford Motor’s plant in Kansas City, where the Transit Euro-style full-size van is made, is adding a third shift.

Ford’s Transit represents the fast-developing trend in the U.S. toward unibody vans, which now include compacts such as its Transit Connect, as well as Ram’s ProMaster City and Nissan’s NV 200 (also sold by GM as the Chevrolet City Express). Daimler’s Sprinter arm is adding a third type here, the “mid-size” Metris, which other builders will watch closely. Its announced pricing, in the $29,000 to $32,000 range, is closer to full-size vans and that might limit its appeal, competitors think. But those prices also reflect the premium stance of the full-size Sprinter, the first Eurovan introduced to America in 2001. GM and Nissan, meanwhile, are finding that there’s plenty of life left in the body-on-frame design.

In the sales derby, Ford has bragging rights and isn’t shy about proclaiming them. It recently sent out a press release announcing that Ford vans captured 56% of the commercial van market and are bestsellers in 47 states. Ford Transit became the best-selling full-size van in America just six months after it went on sale in 2014, Ford says, replacing America’s best-selling van for 35 years, E-Series, which was descended from the Econoline of ‘61. For the 2015 model year, Ford produced more than 100,000 Transits at its Kansas City plant.

Ford Transit Connect, the first compact commercial van introduced to America in 2009, has been the segment’s bestseller for the last five years with a 69% market share, the release continued. TC sales are up 43% in the first half of 2015.

Overall, Ford’s van sales increased 28% January through June, while the segment overall grew 11%. The release didn’t mention the F59 chassis, a strong contender as the platform for walk-in vans and Class A motor homes. Ford’s updated Transit Connect succeeds the original-to-America compact van introduced in 2009, and continues to dominate this segment. Ford’s updated Transit Connect succeeds the original-to-America compact van introduced in 2009, and continues to dominate this segment.

The full-size Transit is now available in 58 variations of wheelbase, roof height and body length, plus cab-chassis and cutaway versions. E-series vans and wagons are gone, but chassis-cabs and cutaways remain in production in Ohio and probably will into 2019. A dozen upfitters are located within 30 miles of the Kansas City plant, allowing convenient equipping of trucks for specific duties. And the current strong economy enables fleets and individuals to replace old trucks.

How long will the prosperity continue? “If I had the answer, I’d probably be operating with more stripes on my shoulder than I have,” says Yaro Hetman, brand manager for Ford’s van products. “I can say that everything we hear from our customers is that the trend to more efficient vehicles is likely to continue. That’s why we made our vans even more ways to suit the job at stake. But it’s also about changing customer preference. Some are switching from trucks [with separate bodies] to vans. You couldn’t stand up in the E series, but you can with a Transit. So plumbers and other tradesmen who drive somewhere and have to get inside for tools and materials are switching to vans.”

Ford offers a 5-cylinder diesel in the Transit, but nine out of 10 customers choose gasoline power because low purchasing and fuel prices make it economical. Yet some fleets have switched over to diesel, Hetman says. One major telecom company did and increased fuel economy by 47%. And long-term, as oil prices go up again, diesel and alternative fuels might be the busier path. CNG or propane can be burned in the 3.7-liter V-6, which fleets tend to take, though they usually stay with gasoline; the stronger 3.5 double-turbo EcoBoost is popular among retail buyers. Altogether the 3.7 takes about two-thirds of gasoline-engine sales. ProMaster’s front-wheel drive is unique to full-size Eurovans sold in North America. It’s gaining a hold in the market, Ram executives say. ProMaster’s front-wheel drive is unique to full-size Eurovans sold in North America. It’s gaining a hold in the market, Ram executives say.

Fiat Chrysler’s Ram ProMaster full-size van has “solidified” in the market and sales are up almost 40% year to date, with 16,774 units and an 11% market share, according to Dave Sowers, head of marketing for commercial vehicles. The ProMaster is unique in the segment with front-wheel-drive, “which is a selling feature from a traction standpoint and, more importantly, in [short] turning radius,” he says. And it has a low floor height for easy loading and unloading.

The small ProMaster City, introduced late last year, combined with the now out-of-production Ram CV (a cargo variant on the Dodge Caravan), tallied 4,454 units for 10% of that segment. Compared to other small vans, Sowers says, “the ProMaster City’s got more cargo space and payload capacity, 1,800 pounds plus 2,000 pounds towing, yet best-in-class fuel economy. It’s a more efficient truck compared to the old body-on-frame truck. It’s all new product for us. It built some momentum and familiarized our customers with our products. For a 100-unit fleet, they might try 10 now, then maybe 20 next year. Customers are surprised at how nice the driving experience is.”

The ProMaster City is selling to two categories: people who work out of their vans (plumbers, technicians, telecom) and the people who deliver – couriers and small businesses like food caterers and florists that are delivering their products. For instance, an irrigation contractor in Arizona uses two ProMaster City vans to carry tools and light PVC piping to customer sites for installation. The ProMaster City’s towing ability comes in handy for fall service work for this customer, when the vans can pull a trailer-mounted heavy air compressor to customers’ properties to blow out lines and prepare them for the cold winter.

But are customers overloading their small vans? Some are, according to Mark Namuth, senior sales manager at Nissan Light Commercial Vehicles, which sells the NV 200 and supplies the Chevy City Express to GM.

“Some are bought by people who are overworking them,” he says. “Something overlooked is that that load is not always water-level, where weight dispersion is even. And the heaviest thing gets plopped at the very rear.

“The body-on-frame truck is forgiving of that, but the unibody not so forgiving…. If he’s over 1,500 pounds of payload, and you add to that a driver and fuel, you need to walk that customer to a full-size van. Beefing it up is not too doable with a unibody.” Nissan’s NV series of cargo vans use the body-on-frame design but come in high-roof as well as low-roof models. Nissan’s NV series of cargo vans use the body-on-frame design but come in high-roof as well as low-roof models.

Body-on-frame thrives

Nissan’s three body-on-frame NV models, the 1500, 2500 HD and 3500 HD, make up 6% of the full-size segment, he says. “We’re selling all we can produce right now, and I think we could increase our market share if we had more production capacity,” Namuth says. “The body-on-frame is still good for us, and GM. You’re giving up a touch of fuel economy and weight, but adding durability and better upfitting capability, like cranes for telecom companies, where the boom sits on frame.”

Its full-size vans come with a limited five-year/100,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranty, the best in the business, Namuth says. The warranty seems a safe bet for Nissan, because its vans are living much longer than promised. One customer that delivers supplies to copper mines in Arizona has an NV 3500 that has run over 550,000 miles, Namuth reports. That van has the strong 5.6-liter V-8, but most customers take the peppy 4-liter V-6.

Will Nissan put the 5-liter diesel, slated for the new Titan XD pickup, in its big vans? “A lot of people are asking will we put that Cummins diesel in the vans, and we’re certainly looking at it,” he says. “But competitors have smaller diesels in their vans, so the Cummins engine is a bit large.” He declines comment on a smaller 4-cylinder Cummins diesel shown late last year in a Nissan Frontier pickup concept. The familiar, rugged body-on-frame design of GMC Savana and Chevrolet Express remains popular with many operators, says GM Fleet & Commercial. The familiar, rugged body-on-frame design of GMC Savana and Chevrolet Express remains popular with many operators, says GM Fleet & Commercial.

GM Fleet & Commercial agrees with Nissan about traditional vans.

“It’s a good market for the body-on-frame design,” says Joe Langhauser, product manager for vans at GM, which continues to sell as many Chevy Expresses and GMC Savanas as it can make. “Customers tell us that ‘it really works for us.’ All upfitters know how to deal with it, it’s reliable and durable. And it’s got the best warranty in the General Motors line of products. And they know they can damage the side panels without getting into operations. Our worst fears of the Eurovan definitely did not come true. I believe there is a market for both of these vans.”

The bulk of GM’s market is a short-wheelbase 2500 series van, he reports. Telecoms and electric utilities are buying the short-wheelbase, low roof version. Some go to a longer wheelbase to get more cargo room for carrying long items, like ladders, but most stay with the shorter model to be able to park easily. Heavy haulers go to the 1-ton 3500 model.

“There’s more growth in cutaways due to changes in federal regulations on greenhouse gases, where the sticking point is declared frontal area,” Langhauser says. “Ours is 74 square feet; our cab is 37 square feet, and upfitters must stay within 74 or 85 square feet to meet the regs. Eurovan cutaways are restricted. G-vans give the upfitters more leeway, and that’s reflected in more and more business in cutaways.” He says GM will add speed late this year after rearranging workloads to maintain quality.

“Diesel remains a very small portion of the portfolio — ambulance, school and shuttle, for those who have diesel fuel on site,” he says. He estimates 95% of the vans they sell have gasoline engines, evenly split between the 4.8- and 6-liter V-8 versions. That’s because gasoline prices are low right now, and there’s a big price premium for diesel, about $12,000. “And gasoline engines go longer [than they used to] — routinely they go 600,000, 700,000 miles,” he says, “and some customers say they go over a million.”

GM’s Chevy City Express compact van, obtained from Nissan, “is meeting our expectations,” Langhauser says. “While we can’t get into specifics, we can tell you that sales are trending upwards and we are hearing from our customers that they love driving it.” The City Express is a unibody design, and GM continues to look at bringing unibody products in from Europe, Langhauser says, “but I can tell you that the body-on-frame will be around for a long time.” Reach walk-in van has an impact-resistant Utilimaster composite body on an Isuzu diesel-powered chassis. Reach walk-in van has an impact-resistant Utilimaster composite body on an Isuzu diesel-powered chassis.

Walk-ins running

At Freightliner Custom Chassis Corp., sales continue to be “robust,” and have been all year, reports Mike Stark, product manager. “In addition, we are seeing strong orders and customer demand through Quarter 1 of 2016. Our customers are anticipating 2016 to be a strong year, so we’re seeing that in our orders thus far.” FCCC makes Class 4 through 7 MT-series chassis on which walk-in bodies from Morgan Olson and Utilimaster are mounted. Customers include package delivery fleets, bakeries, and uniform and linen suppliers.

Demand is not so strong for the Isuzu-Utilimaster Reach van. Sales of walk-in vans rise and fall as the big package delivery fleets order batches of trucks, explains Brian Tabel, marketing manager at Isuzu Commercial Truck.

“For our package-delivery partners, we’re told this was an aviation buying year, and next year is supposed to be a truck buying year.” Last year the major delivery fleets and other customers acquired a little more than 3,000 Reaches. That number may be under 1,000 this year. Mercedes-Benz is introducing its Metris mid-size van, which is a new segment within the cargo vans business. If it sells well, competitors might feel compelled to bring in similar vehicles from Europe. Mercedes-Benz is introducing its Metris mid-size van, which is a new segment within the cargo vans business. If it sells well, competitors might feel compelled to bring in similar vehicles from Europe.

Plumbers and other tradesmen, and non-profit groups that pick up donated goods, are among the retail customers for the Reach. The scuff panels front and rear and along both lower sides of its composite body cost more than aluminum and might keep some buyers from considering it, but those who buy it appreciate its value, Tabel says.

Reach comes in two wheelbases and body lengths, and runs on a 12,000-pound-GVW Isuzu chassis with a 3-liter, 4-cylinder Isuzu diesel and an Aisen 6-speed automatic transmission.

Full article http://www.truckinginfo.com/article/story/2015/10/cargo-vans-prosperity-as-a-problem.aspx

The Features Of Small Hovercraft To Check Before Buying

Some of the important features of personal hovercraft to check before sale are visible to the naked eye and some are not. Others can be tested while looking around the craft, while others still need the craft to be moving. The last category you'll have to take the manufacturer's word for, and so you'll be depending heavily on their reputation and whatever information you ca glean from previous customers - the net is great for this kind of thing. Let us imagine that you're walking up to anew hovercraft and you know absolutely nothing about the industry. What questions should you ask and what should you look for?

We should assume that you've done a minimum amount of homework and are generally happy with company's reputation - you now want to get your hands on an ACV. First of all, do you like the look of it? Just like a car, you need to find it agreeable because you'll be using for quite a while. Take a look at the fittings and fastenings. It's pretty easy to see bad construction and it's mostly the little things that can flag up possible problems. If there is a screw missing from a safety handle, then it's possible that other screws are not too tight and could give trouble later on.

Show the sale person that you know a bit about the subject of hovercraft performance and design by asking about how good ti is at 'getting over the hump'! This is the term used in the industry for the ability of air cushioned vehicles to life off from water, which normally requires up to 300% of floating power to achieve - good explanation here. Helicopters take up to three times more power to lift off than a hovercraft needs to hover, so this feature is a great indicator of performance.

Next, it's an absolute must to ask about the reaction of the craft to the phenomenon known as 'plow in'. This can happen in choppy seas, for example, when waves are constantly lapping up over the bow. In certain circumstances the bow of the hull can be pulled down into the water with disastrous results. Basically, it comes to a full stop, throwing everything that isn't fastened down over the front of the craft. Even if passengers are well strapped in, there is still real risk of injury.



The Coming Age Of The Small Personal Hovercraft

We should be very careful what we wish for. Back in the 60s I used to watch Super Car on TV, with Mike Mercury the puppet character and wished that we all had our own personal floating car that didn't depend on wheels or anything else. Well now we have it! Small personal hovercraft are making a splash everywhere all over the globe, and the price is well withing reach of ordinary mortals like us. For the sporting enthusiast, around 10 000 dollars is considered within reach and you could easily spend that for a top line quad or speed boat. However, air cushioned craft, for that is the real name of the hovercraft, are none of these.



First off, you don't need wheels or a propeller to get these things moving, and moving fast! There's no drag on the vehicle except air flow, which is at the same time an advantage and a disadvantage. With no wheels on the ground , propeller or rudder in the water, it takes quite a while to slow down, stop or change direction. All this means is that there is a learning curve when starting to operate small hovercraft, so it's a no-brainer when it comes to driving it around.

Personal hovercraft have been around for some decades, but not in it's present form. Recent developments in material technology and construction methods have ensured that the price is right, while safety and maintenance are top class. For example, the first hovercraft were made with hulls of glass fiber, which tended to split when they hit something - not a very good advertisement for the industry! Nobody wants a vehicle that breaks in half and takes a lot of money to put back in order, so it was back to the drawing board for the designers. Click to see site

The skirts too have had a complete overhaul. Originally they were made out of rip stop sail cloth, which is used for the big sailing boats. New materials include neoprene coated nylon and kevlar, which is an incredibly tough material capable of stopping bullets. In addition, the engines come in choices of size and are almost maintenance free, apart from popping some oil in now and again. Personal hovercraft transport is certainly taking off ans set to grow in the coming years. Racing enthusiasts like the way you have to throw your weight around to steer them and the family man appreciates the modern commitment to safety.

Hovercrafts - The Perfect Educational Toy

Very small hovercraft such as those made as children's toys are huge fun and have lots of advantages over their bigger cousins. the concept of using air pressure underneath a vehicle as a means of transport was first postulated in 1870, but the materials and engines required to create one were simply not available at that time. Due to these constraints, the first hovercraft appeared as children's toys, which must have helped immensely in their development.

Most people have seen the table game at the seaside where two players stand opposite each other and try to knock a flat plastic disc into the opposing goal. Basically, the disc is an air cushioned vehicle, but it doesn't produce it's own lift. The air pressure that lifts it comes from small holes drilled into the table driven by an electric pump underneath. Hardly a practical means of propulsion for a full size hovercraft, but it does demonstrate the principle very nicely.

Some enterprising kids have even constructed (almost) working one-man ACVs from a simple board and a vacuum cleaner. There isn't quite enough lift to support the vacuum cleaner as well, so a pipe extension is need so that there's a little mobility. I haven't seen one of these, but I'm sure they exist on Youtube. I strikes me that stability would be a major problem though, as there is not design the underneath surface of the board and the skirts are normally very basic. See http://leisure-hovercraft.com

With the advent of molded plastic materials and relatively powerful small DC electric motors, battery powered hovercrafts of a reasonable size started to appear. The real enthusiasts build their own using balsa wood for lightness and two stroke aero engines for lift and forward thrust. These little beauties can reach speeds of 30 to 40 kph and are controlled by radio from a central station with a joy stick for the steering. The great thing about building models is that it's just change of scale to make a working model big enough to ride, and then it gets really exciting!

The dynamics of larger craft are quite different however. Although the principle is the same, larger volumes of air just don't act in the same way. Variations in pressure cause turbulence and this affects the handling of the hovercraft. The bigger types will tend to 'bounce' up and down a little, and also the turbulence will subtly affect the handling. The sheer inertia of a heavier machine means that stops and turns need to be anticipated well in advance, instead of reactng to them as they appear.

Selecting From Used Cars In Kent Uk And Your Options

If you want to get to know what your used cars in Kent buying options are, you've come to the right place. There are a number of great vehicles that you can get for a great price. Make sure you use this information so you don't have to pay too much or get a vehicle that doesn't work properly.

A used vehicle is going to have to be in good shape before you take it home. Don't just trust that you're getting a great deal and a car that's going to run well because a lot of the time dealers are not going to tell you the full story about a vehicle. If you're good with cars, then you can test drive it and see if there are any problems. If not, then just take someone along with you that can help you determine if there is anything wrong with it and if so you can either avoid buying it or ask for money off of the price.

A used vehicle is going to need to be priced fairly, and you can find this out through looking for other vehicles that are the same year and model. Of course, you're going to get a better deal the less it has been used because those with high mileage are going to be less likely to last as long. Certain types of cars or trucks are going to be well made and last longer, and some are just not good to buy at a high mileage.

Do you want to trade in your vehicle so you can get a used one that's going to be a little cheaper depending on what you can trade in? When you take your vehicle to trade it, make sure you go online and look for what it will sell for by finding other ones that are in similar shape and that are the same year. Don't just bring it in and expect to get a lot if there are problems with it because they will check it. Also, you need to clean it and take it through a car wash just to have it looking nice so you are likely to get more for it.

Try to get a warranty of some kind that lets you take the vehicle back for another or to get it fixed free if something is wrong with it. You may end up getting it home, only to find out that there is some kind of problem that you're going to have to fix before you can safely drive. Don't just chalk it up to bad luck if you don't have to, because some dealerships will do a fix for free if it was a problem they missed.

Your used cars buying options for the Kent area are varied and you can always find what you need. The rarer the vehicle, the more research you will have to do. Be sure you use these pieces of advice and you'll find any vehicle you need.



Don't Ignore The Special Requirements For Using Deep Cycle Batteries

If you ever own anything that says it requires deep cycle batteries, do not ignore the warnings advising you to use those specifically. Not all batteries are the same, as many things and machines use what are instead called starter batteries. Starter batteries are common in cars, where they give short yet intense bursts of power in order to get an engine cranked and going.

Deep cycle batteries are different. They discharge almost half to three quarters of their power reserve in order to get the attached equipment running and going. As such, these batteries are of a lead-acid design, and often oversized and heavy.

Keeping a deep cycle battery going over a long life span can sometimes be a little tricky. The massive discharges can drain the battery over time. To keep a deep cycle battery operating optimally for a long time, then it is best to set things up so that a battery never dips below twenty percent of its reserve, and that the initial burst is more towards the forty five percent range and not three quarters.

The uses of deep cycle batteries are not uses that everyday citizens would likely make personal use of in their normal lives, but there are uses all around that people would recognize. Traffic signals often use these kinds of batteries, as do UPS power supplies for computers and sump pumps.

A very common use of deep cycle batteries is in motorized equipment. Motorized wheelchairs often use deep cycle batteries, as do golf carts, and electrically-propelled industrial street sweepers and forklifts are common applications for such batteries. There are many marine uses too in fishing boats and other aquatic craft.

Other common applications include energy-independent systems on land, such as highway rest stops or structures needing electricity when far removed from a municipal power grid. Solar power systems also use deep cycle batteries to collect sunlight all day and then store the power for use at night or in cloudy weather.

If any of these situations is a part of your life, be it working on a forklift, a friend or family member with a motorized wheelchair, or you own a UPS system, a boat, or a solar power system, you might have a deep cycle battery somewhere near you. If it ever needs repair or maintenance, then make sure you replace it with another deep cycle battery and do not treat it as a starter battery, lest the equipment not work in the future.



#DontIgnoreTheSpecialRequirementsForUsingDeepCycleBatteries

The Qualites Of A Good Motorcycle Instructor

A career in training people on how to ride a motorbike can be fulfilling since one gets to interact with all kinds of individuals with different personalities. Not so many jobs come with a sense of satisfaction and fun as being as a motorcycle instructor. Passing down knowledge to a complete novice and helping them to become confident and safe riders from a wobbly rider is satisfying. However, this is a privilege that must be handled with a lot of care to ensure that your students are well equipped for the task and the safety of other road users as well as the student is assured when they are on their own.

For one to qualify as a motorbike instructor, they need to be experienced in motorcycle riding and be holders of a clean bike license for a given number of years depending on the state or country that they come from. Apart from the requirements, a motorbike instructor must possess the following skills in order to be effective.

Good communication skill; training people on motorcycle riding involves passing down critical skills to the learner. However much one is experienced, they need to be able to communicate and understand the needs of their student so as to train them effectively. One must have a mastery of the theoretical and safety aspect of motorcycle riding

Patience, training a novice on how to handle a motorbike can be a daunting task. The pressure and tension involved can make somebody to do repeatedly the same mistake. One needs to be patient and focus on making sure the learner gets the skill, however, slow they are. One needs to encourage the them especially when they realize they are slow learners.

Intuitive, a small mistake by the learner during a motorcycle training session can be devastating and even cause accidents and injuries. A good instructor is one that is able to sense when the learner is just about to make a mistake and counter their actions in a professional manner.

Adaptable and responsive, a good instructor is one who quickly learns the weaknesses of their students and works towards making them better. One should be able to derive different methods of passing down the skills. They must be willing to listen to the students point of view regarding a particular concern.

Motorcycle Instructors must always be aware of any changes in the rules and regulations that govern motorbike tests and inform their students prior to the day of the test.

If Your Vehicle Battery Breaks Down

Sooner or later, a lot of vehicle drivers may well experience battery troubles. You get in, place the keys into the ignition and you get nothing at all, Or you might see the dash lights flickering or maybe hear a clicking from the starter.

There may have been a few of the common signs of your battery about to fail that you missed, In the case where this has happened to you and you have been left stuck at your workplace or home more than likely it can leave you in a bit of a situation. There are a couple of options accessible to you.

Search for A Nearby Garage To Remove And Replace Your Vehicle Battery For You.

You could browse for a local garage whom could be able to book you in swiftly for battery replacement, but a challenge you could possibly face is getting the car there.

The mechanic might be able to come and jump start the vehicle for you or you could be able to do this for yourself.

Replace The Car Battery For Yourself.

If you hold some experience with vehicles you may well be tempted change this by yourself.. You would need to find a battery store local to you and go and collect the new battery. But confirm they they have the right battery in stock for your car before you go.

If your unsure there are on-line battery finders where you can input in your registration and it would suggest the battery for you. Otherwise you can certainly examine the battery in your car, which should have a label with relevant information about the battery kind.

Get In Touch With A Mobile Vehicle Battery Replacement Specialist.

A fantastic solution is to speak to a car battery replacement organisation, these guys would most likely be able to come the exact location where your vehicle is stuck and replace the car battery for you at a decent rate. This saves a lot of trouble and inconvenience.

Your vehicle battery is critical to the starting of your car, but many people often forget to inspect it from time to time.

When your looking at the levels in the car is often best to inspect the battery, are the battery leads still tight and free from corrosion, ensure there are no hints of leakage and the battery is still securely fixed to the car.

Why You Should Use A Gps Tracker For Fleet Vehicles



Managing a fleet of vehicles is a demanding job. There is only so much you can do without being able to track your vehicles in real-time, which is why you should look into using GPS trackers for your vehicles. These GPS trackers can be installed in each vehicle in a very discreet manner. They will communicate with your computer and let you see where each vehicle or container is in real-time. The software that comes with these GPS tools collects data on the routes taken and can provide you with information such as the amount of time a vehicle spends on the road, how close it is to needing more gas or calculate the average delivery time.

Being able to track your vehicles in real-time will help you make better decisions. If you need to schedule a pick-up or a delivery at the last minute, all you have to do is check your GPS data to figure out which vehicle is in a nearby area. You can also use this information to provide a client with accurate information regarding when they can expect a delivery.

Tracking your fleet vehicles with GPS devices will also help you make your fleet more efficient. You can for instance use the data collected to figure out which routes are not efficient, for instance due to bad traffic conditions or to recurring construction. Drivers will also feel a lot more accountable and will always take the best route and avoid unnecessary stops if they know you can track where they are.

GPS tracking is a very valuable tool in case of an emergency. You can see exactly where all your drivers are and determine the best course of action for everyone if weather conditions suddenly become dangerous. You can also detect unusual activities, such as unplanned stops which could be a sign that a driver is getting robbed. GPS devices will help you make sure that every driver reaches their destination safely and will provide you with the opportunity to contact law enforcement in a much shorter time-frame if something happens.

Using GPS devices to track your vehicles is something you should look into if you have a fleet to manage. These tools will help you save a lot of time and help you improve the way you manage your fleet and plan your routes besides keeping your drivers safe and making them more accountable.

What You Need To Know To Choose The Right Limousine Rental Company

Choosing the right limo company can be one of the most important task you do when planning for a special event. Usually the way you arrive to an event can set the tone for the event and if you arrive on time, safely, comfortable, and in a good mood then you can rest assured the event is off to a great start.

On the other hand if you arrive late, uncomfortable (bad ride or no air condition), and in a bad mood because of a rude limo driver then you may have a long day/night ahead of you. So selecting the right company for your event is an important task that cannot be ignored. Below we will discuss several things you need to know when choosing the right limousine rental company.

When talking with the different limo companies check to see how often they do Inspections on their vehicles. This maintenance check tells you how seriously they take safety. You want them to put your safety above all else when you are in their care, so having regular inspections is important. You should also visit the business prior to your event to look at the limousine for yourself to see what you and your party will be riding in.

Most limo companies are a part of transportation associations. Find out what associations they belong to and check their standing within that association and see what others have to say about the company you are planning to rent a limousine from. Many of these associations are public entities that are required to release any information that you ask, so do your due diligence.

Every limo owner is required to carry insurance on their vehicle. This should not be personal vehicular insurance that you or I may have on a vehicle, they are required to have commercial vehicular insurance. The minimum liability insurance they should have per car is $750,000. Check your state for the exact minimum insurance required, and then make sure the limousine company you are planning to rent from has the minimum insurance required.

In addition to the insurance, every limousine rental company is required to have a state license to operate their business. Make sure to check with the limo owner to ensure they have the required licenses for their business. You do not want to assume they have the right protection because if the limo gets stopped during the time you are within the vehicle, if they are not properly licensed and insured there is a chance you may be stranded.

Knowing the information is half the battle. Now that you have a better understanding of the things you should know about choosing the right limo company, make sure you apply this information so you can have the best experience possible.